Bad roads slow down life

Chennai, September 9, 2017:

Drainage projects are making it difficult for residents in Perungudi to move around.

Last year, the roads were dug up by Chennai Metrowater, to modernize drinking water and drainage facility in the suburbs.

However, the underground sewage works have not been completed in several areas including residential neighbourhoods like Kurinji Nagar and Anna Nagar, in Perungudi.

About a month ago the work resumed in some areas.  The laying of roads is almost done, but they are yet to be blacktopped.

As a result of that, neither cars nor autos can enter the locality as the roads have turned into grazing land for cows. People residing there often find it difficult to commute to work or buy grocery items from stores, which are 3 km to 4 km away. Even walking is a task with mounds of earth and loose stones.

And after long spells of showers, water fills up the yawning potholes causing inconvenience to motorists as they struggle to negotiate such stretches.

In response to complaints, “Metrowater stopped sanctioning new projects about six months ago,” a Metrowater official said. Corporation has delayed the remaining development work, according to them.

Reportedly, problems in acquisition of land to construct the sewage treatment plant and delay in tendering process have led to the slowdown of work.

However, about a month ago the work resumed in some areas.  The laying of roads is almost done, but they are yet to be blacktopped.

Regardless of that, unless the sewage pipes are properly installed, Corporation will not be able to conduct a detailed study to see if the groundwater has been contaminated in residential neighbourhoods around dumpsites in the city.

IIT Madras is supposed to conduct the study. Data on water contamination in and around Kodungaiyur and Perungudi dump will be used to improve public health of residential areas and promote alternatives to existing methods of solid waste management, The Hindu reported earlier this year.

 Corporation will not be able to conduct a detailed study to see if the groundwater has been contaminated in residential neighbourhoods around dumpsites in the city

Also, the drainage work was scheduled to be completed by July. But the procedural hassles delayed it. Hence, the groundwater study could not be carried out yet.

Consequently, there have been no changes to improve the state of public health and waste management.

Back in April, Mr K.P. Munusamy, Tamil Nadu Minister for Municipal Administration, had announced that water supply and drainage facilities will be strengthened at a cost of Rs. 2,000 crore. Metrowater, was also supposed to set up sewerage facilities at a cost of Rs. 1,300 crore in these areas.